Whitworth University has a policy that courses with student enrollment of less than eight will be canceled. I understand this policy. Every organization, business, and institution should know its financial break even points and discipline itself to only engage in activities that are financially viable.

For the past month, the enrollment in my course,  TH317 Cross Cultural Ministry, has never gone above seven. The head of my department wanted this course to go, so he petitioned his superiors and they agreed to allow an exception. They said the course could go as long as there were at least six students. The first class meeting was yesterday. Only five students came. Two students had decided to transfer to other courses. This left us short and disappointed. However, with the possibility that some students might transfer into our course, we experienced positive energy in the classroom and began to look forward to spending the semester together. Unfortunately, no students chose to transfer into TH317 and today the course was terminated.

During my career I have regularly observed organizations who refused to let go of projects and initiatives that were financial potholes. So, when I was notified today that the course was being canceled I was simultaneously disappointed and pleased. I am disappointed that I will not be teaching, but I affirm the University’s decision. Canceling my class demonstrates institutional integrity.